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The owner of this page is DinosaursRoar. According to policy, no other user, with the exception of admins, may edit this page without the owner's permission. If they do, they will be blocked.

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The owner of this page is FreezingTNT. According to policy, no other user, with the exception of admins, may edit this page without the owner's permission. If they do, they will be blocked.

Pleistocene rewilding is the advocacy of the reintroduction of descendants of Pleistocene megafauna, or their close ecological equivalents. An extension of the conservation practice of rewilding, which involves reintroducing species to areas where they became extinct in recent history (hundreds of years ago or less).

Towards the end of the Pleistocene era (roughly 13,000 to 10,000 years ago), nearly all megafauna of Europe, as well as South, Central and North America, dwindled towards extinction, in what has been referred to as the Quaternary extinction event. With the loss of large herbivores and predator species, niches important for ecosystem functioning were left unoccupied. In the words of the biologist Tim Flannery, "ever since the extinction of the megafauna 13,000 years ago, the continent has had a seriously unbalanced fauna". This means, for example, that the managers of national parks in North America have to resort to culling to keep the population of ungulates under control.

Paul S. Martin (originator of the Pleistocene overkill hypothesis[4]) states that present ecological communities in North America do not function appropriately in the absence of megafauna, because much of the native flora and fauna evolved under the influence of large mammals.

Ecological and evolutionary implications Edit

Research shows that species interactions play a pivotal role in conservation efforts. Communities where species evolved in response to Pleistocene megafauna (but now lack large mammals) may be in danger of collapse. Most living megafauna are threatened or endangered; extant megafauna have a significant impact on the communities they occupy, which supports the idea that communities evolved in response to large mammals. Pleistocene rewilding could "serve as additional refugia to help preserve that evolutionary potential" of megafauna. Reintroducing megafauna to North America could preserve current megafauna, while filling ecological niches that have been vacant since the Pleistocene.

Possible candidates for introduction (North America) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Birds Edit

  • Emu (as a proxy for the extinct western rhea)
  • Wild turkey (as a proxy for the extinct Californian turkey, Meleagris californica)

Reptiles Edit

  • Bolson tortoise (as a proxy for the extinct North American Bolson tortoise)

Mammals Edit

  • Vampire human (as a proxy for the extinct subspecies of predatory Homo Sapiens)
  • Rainbraous (as a proxy for the extinct American pegasus)
  • Eckia (as a proxy for the extinct American winged unicorn)
  • Corey mc (as a proxy for the extinct Clovis people)
  • Savaish (as a proxy for the extinct Clovis people)
  • Opossum (as a proxy for the extinct California opossum)
  • Springhare (as a proxy for the extinct giant kangaroo rat)
  • Gerbil (as a proxy for the extinct false kangaroo rats)
  • Capuchin monkeys (as a proxy for the extinct capuchin-like North American monkeys)
  • Spider monkeys (as a proxy for the extinct spider monkey-like North American monkeys)
  • Babookari (as a proxy for the extinct northern giant monkey, Americopithecus, a baboon-like North American relative of capuchins)
  • Tasmanian devil (as a proxy for the extinct pyrocarnus, an extinct predatory opossum)
  • Kakamora (as a proxy for other ground sloths, which are sadly extinct)
  • Giant anteater (as a proxy for some species of extinct ground sloths)
  • Giant armadillo as a proxy for some of the extinct species of Glyptodonts)
  • Modern vampire bats (as a proxy for many species of extinct North American vampire bats, including the famous giant vampire bat)
  • Wild yak (as a proxy for the extinct American yak)
  • Giraffe (as a proxy for the extinct American indricotheres)
  • Okapi (as a proxy for the extinct American indricotheres)
  • Impala (as a proxy for the extinct Stockoceros, a prehistoric species of pronghorn)
  • Blackbuck (as a proxy for the extinct Tetrameryx, a prehistoric species of pronghorn)
  • Gerenuk (as a proxy for the extinct Mouranomeryx, a prehistoric species of pronghorn which had a long gerenuk-like neck)
  • Guanaco (as a proxy for the extinct American camelids)
  • Vicuña (as a proxy for the extinct American camelids)
  • Domestic Mesoron (as a proxy for the extinct Moropus, a native North American chalicothere)
  • Mustang (as a proxy for the extinct American wild horses)
  • Donkey (as a proxy for the extinct American wild horses)
  • Plains zebra (as a proxy for the extinct American wild horses)

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

  • Bull shark (as a proxy for the extinct American bull shark)

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

  • Carakiller (as a proxy for the extinct terror birds)

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

  • Snowstalker (as a proxy for the extinct Smilodon, a saber-toothed cat or [inaccurately] saber-toothed tiger)

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (South America) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

  • Saltwater crocodile (as a proxy for the extinct Giganotosuchus, the largest recent crocodilian species, which was about 32-35 feet long and fed on Pleistocene mammals and only died out 10,000 years ago due to humans killing off the Giganotosuchus's prey items.

Mammals Edit

  • Asian elephant (as a proxy for the extinct South American gompotheres)
  • Malayan tapir (as a proxy for the extinct Tapirus rondoniensis, a giant South American tapir)
  • Kakamora (as a proxy for other ground sloths, which are sadly extinct)

Amphibians Edit

  • Goliath frog (as a proxy for the extinct giant marshland frog, a frog that died out in 1941)

Fish Edit

  • Bermuda killifish (as a proxy for the extinct Titicaca orestias, an extinct South American killifish that was native to Lake Titicaca in South America)

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

  • Carakiller (as a proxy for the extinct terror birds)

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (Europe) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

  • Tenerife lizard (as a proxy for the extinct Roque Chico de Salmor giant lizard)

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (Africa) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

  • Domestic Mesoron (as a proxy for the extinct Chalicotherium)
  • Wild Asian Mesoron (as a proxy for the extinct Ancylotherium, the direct ancestors of Mesoron)
  • Asian elephant (as a proxy for the extinct Palaeoloxodon)
  • False mastodon (as a proxy for the extinct Deinotherium)
  • Dromedary camel (as a proxy for the extinct African Paracamelus, a widespread species of prehistoric camel that was native to much of Africa)
  • Jaguar (as a proxy for the extinct Megantereon)

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (Asia) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Birds Edit

  • Common ostrich (as a proxy for the extinct Arabian ostrich and the extinct Asian ostrich)

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

  • Mountain gorilla (as a proxy for the extinct Gigantopethicus, which was the largest ape that has ever lived)

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (Australia) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Mammals Edit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Possible candidates for introduction (Antarctica) Edit

Already introducedEdit

Mammals Edit

  • Walrus (as a proxy for the extinct giant elephant seal, Megamirounga, the biggest pinniped and the largest carnivoran that ever lived)
  • Harbor seal (as a proxy for various extinct seal species)

Birds Edit

  • African penguin (as a proxy for the extinct Dwarf southern penguin, which was smaller than most species of Antaractican penguins and was similar to today's African penguins)

Reptiles Edit

  • Genetically-engineered garter snake (as a proxy for the extinct egg-snatcher, an extinct snake that was the only snake native to Antarctica and the only one to tolerate Antarctican climate and temperature, and even fed on eggs and chicks of penguins)

Amphibians Edit

  • Genetically-engineered wood frog (as a proxy for the extinct Antarctican frog, the only frog native to Antarctica and the only one to naturally tolerate Antarctican climates and temperatures, it mainly fed on insects that were native to Antarctica)

Fish Edit

Near future introductionsEdit

Birds Edit

Reptiles Edit

Mammals Edit

Amphibians Edit

Fish Edit

Rules Edit

  • Please do not add animals that replace the ones that are already going to be cloned in real life, like woolly mammoths, dodos, passenger pigeons, thylacines, moas, etc.
  • Please do not edit without my and DinosaursRoar's permissions.
  • Please do not copy this page.
  • Please don't use fictional species (except for Future Is Wild animals [e.g. carakillers would replace terror birds], After Man animals [e.g. Raboons would replace short-faced bears], DeviantArt's animals, and/or animals the users of this wikia have made).
  • Please add locations for every animal (example: TBA [as a proxy for the extinct TBA; introduced to {location})
  • Please add animals that can replace non-De Extinction animals. But also have them replace the ones from 13,000 years ago to the present day.

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